Monday, August 25, 2014

MONDAY MUSINGS—FIRST YOU NEED A BUCKET OF ICE…



Then video camera…

Everywhere you look on social media or in the news there is someone doing the ice bucket challenge. Standing in one place and having a bucket of ice poured over the head. What in the world?

It’s an eye-catching gimmick but for a cause—raising money for a charitable cause or organizations.  The gimmick works because people want to see it and you-tube is full of them, neighborhoods and news media cover them, and the rich and the famous participate with the accompanying media. It draws the attention to various charities or community needs. 

Of course there are variations of it, like with actor and active member of the Louisiana police force, Orlando Jones, with his bucket of bullet casings. His challenge had to do with an issue rather than a charity. He said, in an interview, 
I wanted to do…talk about the insanity happening in Ferguson and just around the world. Those shell casings in my video represent the people who paid the ultimate cost for the freedoms we have today. I couldn’t find enough bullets to dump on myself to illustrate the number of people who gave their lives for a very important ideal.” 
- See more at: http://madamenoire.com/460952/bullet-bucket-challenge/#sthash.V96bbiKN.dpuf

Not a bad idea but it’s nothing new.


In the early 1900’s there was a practice of dunking, swimming, plunging into an icy body of water in the winter. Polar bear plunge certainly got attention and it also was used for charitable causes and usually had multiple participants and well publicized. A side note here is the polar bear plunge hasn’t been used just for raising money for a particular charity but held as a New Year tradition in many places of the world.

Communities have used a variation of it in fairs (and community street fairs) for charity. I’m sure you’ve seen the dunking booths. Usually someone of note from the community sits in a chair or on a bench and people pay a fee for the privilege of throwing a ball or series of balls at a target that releases the chair and drops the person into the water. In my neck of the woods when the police chief took a turn in the chair (several community leaders take a turn on that day) there was quite a windfall of funds raised. Hey, work out your aggressions in a safe manner and raise money at the same time? A good thing and I have to say, I was impressed with how accurate the participants were and how much time the chief spent in the dunking pool Lol! All the money raised by selling those balls to throw go to a designated community need—might be for the local school or library, build a community park, adding funds for the operation of the fire department, for repairing damage from storms, and that’s just a few reasons my town held them.


  • What about you? What do you think about this latest craze?

  • Have you done the ice-bucket challenge? Maybe you've participated in a winter polar plunge or bought a ball or two for a community-dunking booth?


18 comments:

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Sia .. I'm afraid I get a bit sick of these viral things ...

However Motor Neurone Disease definitely deserves funds to help and do more research ...

But I admire all and communities who set a fund-raising up for their local charity/charities ..

Cheers Hilary

Optimistic Existentialist said...

A lot of people have been making fun of the Ice Bucket Challege but it's raised over 50 million since it began. I think it's a wonderful thing!

D.G. Hudson said...

It reminds me of TV's 'funniest home videos'. IF it generates money for a good cause, so be it.
Five mins of fame for those so inclined.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Jones certainly gets his point across.
I was tagged to do the ice bucket challenge and opted to donate instead.

Mason Canyon said...

I think it's great that so much money and awareness is being raised for good causes. However, I do worry about the health risks of pulling ice water over someone. It looks like that could put a person's body in shock. Hopefully people are being cautious while doing a good deed.

L. Diane Wolfe said...

If it brings awareness and raised money, it's a good thing.

When I used to go swimming at the river by my grandparents' cabin, the water sometimes felt like the Polar Bear Challenge.

~Sia McKye~ said...

HILARY--they do get old when you see them everywhere. But the causes are usually good. :-)

KEITH--For sure it has raise some major funds!

DG--You're right it is much like watching tv's funniest home videos. I'm with you, if it works great. :-)

ALEX--Jones sure did! I can't say as I blame you for opting for making a donation as opposed to a bucket of ice and water, lol!

~Sia McKye~ said...

MASON--I think most are aware of the effects icy cold water can give.

DIANE--yah, here, too. The water is fairly warm in the shallows but you dive in deeper--brrr. Where we swim on the river there is also a icy cold spring that feeds into the river and oh my word THAT is some cold water--especially if you are unaware of the spring's location.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

Most of the charitable physical things I've done are running events and of course the Penn State Dance Marathon. Thon has raised millions for pediatric cancer and made it possible for any child getting treated for cancer at Hershey Medical Center will do so cost free. I done runs for ALS but not the ice bucket challenge.

WiseRosy said...

Any money raised for charity is a good thing however it is raised.

Yvonne.

Liza said...

I don't like to use the word craze for this. It was/is a good cause that's gone viral and made a lot of money that can be used to research a cure for a dreadful disease. What I hope is that every other charity doesn't get on the bandwagon and try to emulate this ALS challenge. THEN it will be a craze, and crazy...and could drown us! But I bucketed AND donated and feel glad for it.

Jo said...

A lot of people are doing the ice bucket and donating anyway.

I think I shied a ball to dunk someone some years ago. Probably missed.

Jo said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Natalie Aguirre said...

I think it's great when something catches on that generates awareness and money toward diseases like ALS. There are many that don't get enough attention or money.

~Sia McKye~ said...

SUSAN-- I have too, but not running in 15 years but I regularly do walk-a-thons for cancer. I have a personal connection to that.

YVONNE--I agree.

LIZA--it IS a dreadful disease! I've contributed but no buckets. :-) I used craze, I guess, because it's everywhere I look. Perhaps a wiser choice would have been viral.

JO--I'll admit, I've done my share of throwing balls to dunk community representatives for charity. It's fun and raises good money for the community.

NATALIE--Yes. If it captures the attention of younger ones all the better. It helps them see the need to be aware of helping others and it can be fun as well.

Plowing Through Life (Martha) said...

Many people I know have done this; even my own daughter. I think raising awareness and money is a good thing even if it's done this way. I just hope that other charities don't lose out on regular funding. People have a limited amount of money to donate to charities and they should give where their heart tells them to, or to a cause that means something to them. Not by social pressure.

cleemckenzie said...

I guess everyone wants to see others make a fool of themselves and enjoy it. I'm passing on the icy water over the head, however.

Crystal Collier said...

The first couple times I saw something about the challenge, I thought, "How cool! Way to raise awareness." Now I kind of roll my eyes when I see a post. I know, I know, not cool, but I can't help it. Call it a short attention span, but we're always looking for the next sensational thing, right?