Wednesday, February 12, 2014

MY LIFELONG ROMANCE WITH WRITING



My guest is historical and romance author, Christy English. She's been in love with writing stories since the tender age of 8 when she concluded that writing was a whole lot harder than she first thought. Still, her love affair with words kept her at it until she finally got it right--years later. I, for one, am glad she persevered! 


When I was four years old, I asked for a typewriter for my birthday. And due to the love and devotion of my parents, I got one: a bright, shiny yellow one.

At this point in my life, I knew the alphabet and had begun to learn to read, but writing was a far distant goal...something that at that point had never consciously occurred to me. I did think it odd that the letters were all out of order on the key board. To be honest, I still don't know why the keyboard is like that. I am not even sure why i wanted that typewriter. I just knew that I did.

When I was 8 years old, I finished reading one of my library books and for the first time in my life, I thought: "I can do that." I got about five chapters into my novel, handwritten in poor, painstaking script, one page per "chapter", and then I gave up. It seemed that writing was much harder than it looked.

From the time I was 12, I began to have characters show up with stories to tell, dancing in my head. I know that sounds a little nuts, probably because it is, but those of you who are writers will know what I mean. And when these characters showed up, I started writing their stories down. I never foisted these hideous works of "art" off on other people, except for a couple of devoted friends (LaDonna and Laura, you know who you are.) Those two patiently read and praised stories that were so bad, they would peel paint of the walls. Trust me when I say that telling a good story is a  skill that takes YEARS to learn. Or at least, it took me years to learn how to do it.

So now, when I look at MUCH ADO ABOUT JACK, my fifth novel, and my third romance, I think of all the truly terrible writing I used to do, and I am amazed that I finally got better. Amazed and grateful.

If we focus and work hard, we can produce good writing. Storytelling is a joy, for the teller and, hopefully, for the reader. 

Good luck and many blessings on all of you who are writers, too, published and yet-to-be-published. Hang in there. If I can do it, so can you.

                                                                                                                                                    

BUY: AmazonB&NB-a-M,ChpIndigoIndieBound

MUCH ADO ABOUT JACK 


How to Become London's Most Notorious Widow:
1. Vow to NEVER remarry
2. Own a ship and become fabulously wealthy
3. Wear the latest risqué fashions in your signature color
4. Do NOT have a liaison at the Prince Regent's palace with a naval captain whose broad shoulders and green eyes make you forget Rule #1

Angelique Beauchamp, the widowed Countess of Devonshire, has been twice burned by love, and she is certain that no man will ever touch her heart again. But that doesn't mean she can't indulge a little—and it would be hard to find a more perfect dalliance than one with the dashing Captain James Montgomery.

After a brief torrid affair, James tries to forget Angelique and his undeniable thirst for more. The luscious lady was quite clear that their liaison was temporary. But for the first time, the lure of the sea isn't powerful enough to keep him away...

                                                                                                                         

Christy English is happiest when she is dreaming. Her dreams have taken her to the royal court of Henry II in THE QUEEN’S PAWN, to medieval Paris in TO BE QUEEN, and now to Regency England in MUCH ADO ABOUT JACK, LOVE ON A MIDSUMMER NIGHT, and HOW TO TAME A WILFULL WIFE, where she loves to watch her characters find true love, often in spite of themselves. 

Please visit her on her blog, Facebook, or  Twitter 

12 comments:

Pk Hrezo said...

Nice to meet Christy! I was the same way--always writing as a child. I'm quite sure they were awful. Even thinking back to my first novel written as an adult. *shudders*
It is fun looking back at how far we've come tho. :)

ChristyEnglish said...

Nice to meet you too Pk :) It is fun too look back. It makes me laugh an very happy that I put in the hard work. I want to keep getting better, too. That's a joy of writing, never being satisfied with what we just finished :)

ChristyEnglish said...

Sia, thank you so much for hosting me. I had a great time walking back down memory lane, and thinking of all the years that went into my work. It's an adventure. Thank you for letting me talk about it here :)

~Sia McKye~ said...

Christy, it's my pleasure to have you here and sharing your thoughts on writing.

I have to say that I always wanted the keyboard to follow the alphabet too. I remember reading something about how the keys were originally alphabetical but typist speeds did something with tangling the keys on the original typewriters. So they rearranged the keys. Remember, on the manual typewriter the keys were attached to small wire arms and had to strike the page. I can also remember tangling them when you didn't cleanly hit the key correctly.

Kat Sheridan said...

Hi, Christy! The book sounds like great fun! How wonderful that you stuck to your dream and made it happen!

ChristyEnglish said...

How cool Sia! I love historical tidbits like that. I miss the sound of those little keys hitting the paper. Such a satisfying sound.

Hi Kat, I am happy to meet you :) It is wild how these things come to be...I wrote all my life but never thought I would actually try writing for an audience until I was in my late twenties. Life knows more than we do sometimes.

Liz Blocker said...

I love this - it's so familiar! And a perfect post for Valentine's Day :)

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Amazed you got better - I think we all feel like that!
Your book's cover artist did a stunning job.

cleemckenzie said...

Thanks for introducing us to Christy. I loved her comment about all the terrible writing she used to do. I guess we all can point to that terrible stuff. I know I can.

ChristyEnglish said...

Thank you Liz :) Happy almost Valentine's Day :)

Alex, thanks for the cover compliment...Sourcebooks does such an amazing job with them :)

Thanks for coming by Clee! Many blessings on your own work :)

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Jo said...

I love the cover on the book too. Looks like a book I would also love to read. Got it marked on Amazon.

Glad you got better.